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Friday, July 24, 2020 | History

3 edition of Intercomparison of hydrologic processes in global climate models found in the catalog.

Intercomparison of hydrologic processes in global climate models

Intercomparison of hydrologic processes in global climate models

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  • 29 Currently reading

Published by National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Goddard Space Flight Center, National Technical Information Service, distributor in Greenbelt, Md, [Springfield, Va .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Atmospheric general circulation models.,
  • Climate models.,
  • Evaporation.,
  • Frequency distribution.,
  • Hydrological cycle.,
  • Hydrology models.,
  • Precipitation (Meteorology),
  • Temperature effects.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementW.K.-M. Lau, Y.C. Sud, J.-H. Kim.
    SeriesNASA technical memorandum -- 104617.
    ContributionsSud, Y. C., Kim, J. H., Goddard Space Flight Center.
    The Physical Object
    FormatMicroform
    Pagination1 v.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL15413454M

    where S is the change in soil moisture, P is precipitation, E is evapotranspiration, and Q is runoff. In operational hydrology a major concern is flood forecasting. For floods large enough to put the public at risk, the soil tends to be saturated, so? of climate extremes in an idealized geoengineering experi-ment, submitted to Journal of Geophysical Research, ). Geoengineering offsets the intensification of the hydrologic cycle, particularly suppressing the “rich get richer” [e.g., Held and Soden, ] effect of increased CO 2 in which areas already receiving intense precipitation.

    of terrestrial processes, ice sheet dynamics, oceanic dynamics, and other processes. These models are used as tools to understand climate variability (control runs) and to simulate how climate change will affect the planet (forced runs) not only at the annual/global average level but over specific areas of the globe. To quantitatively evaluate past and future climate, global circulation models (GCMs) are widely used, accounting for the interactive changes driven by global atmosphere and oceans (Hagemann et al. ; Markstrom et al. ).The data resolution is from a few degrees to hundreds of kilometers (Vidal & Wade ; Najafi et al. ).Due to great heterogeneities in terms of Cited by: 3.

    models. Subsequently, historic simulations of extreme precipitation from 21 CMIP5 (Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5) global climate models were evaluated against two reanalysis datasets during It was found that most models overestimate extreme precipitation in the mountain regions in. Projections of changes in the hydrological cycle from global hydrological models (GHMs) driven by global climate models (GCMs) are critical for understanding future occurrence of hydrological extremes. However, uncertainties remain large and need to be better assessed. In particular, recent studies have pointedCited by:


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Intercomparison of hydrologic processes in global climate models Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. Intercomparison of hydrologic processes in global climate models. [W K -M Lau; Y C Sud; J -H Kim; Goddard Space Flight Center.].

Ideally, the results from models operating at different scales should agree in trend direction and magnitude of impacts under climate change. However, this implies that the sensitivity to climate variability and climate change is comparable for impact models designed for either scale.

In this study, we compare hydrological changes simulated by 9 global and 9 Cited by: B Use of Climate and Hydrologic Models for Projecting Future Water Resources. One way for the OST to be used as a planning tool for climate change is for it to be exercised in a chain-of-models approach (Vogel et al., ).To characterize how a changing climate may affect hydrologic processes and water resources at regional scales, many studies utilize downscaled.

@article{osti_, title = {Cross-scale intercomparison of climate change impacts simulated by regional and global hydrological models in eleven large river basins}, author = {Hattermann, F.

and Krysanova, V. and Gosling, S. and Dankers, R. and Daggupati, P. and Donnelly, C. and Flörke, M. and Huang, S. and Motovilov, Y. and Buda, S. An intercomparison of regional climate model data for hydrological impact studies in Denmark Article in Journal of Hydrology February.

This study suggested that improvements to these types of models may come from more realistic descriptions of hydrologic processes in arid environments. The second study examined water balance parameters of four of these models (Biome-BGC, Century, LPJ, and MC1) from the inception of the VEMAP climatological data base in through Climate change is a global phenomenon, and a global overview on climate change impacts (done by global hydrological models, GHMs) is important, and can motivate regional impact assessment.

• Climate change impacts manifest at the regional scale, where most mitigation and adaptation measures are planned and implemented. Intercomparison of regional-scale hydrological models: papers planning Evaluation of models Comparison of impacts Sources of uncertainty Global –Regional comparisons basins, multi-models basins, multi-models seas.

dyn. extremes (%) droughts IHA water balance MacKenzie, Lena Blue Nile Amazon Yangtze HMs & parametrization trends: RCPs. We present one of the first climate change impact assessments on river runoff that utilises an ensemble of global hydrological models (Glob-HMs) and an ensemble of catchment-scale hydrological models (Cat-HMs), across multiple catchments: the upper Amazon, Darling, Ganges, Lena, upper Mississippi, upper Niger, Rhine and Tagus.

Relative changes in Cited by: The integrated hydrologic model intercomparison project, IH-MIP2: A second set of benchmark results to diagnose integrated hydrology and feedbacks November. [1] An analysis of the climate of precipitation extremes as simulated by six European regional climate models (RCMs) is undertaken in order to describe/quantify future changes and to examine/interpret differences between models.

Each model has adopted boundary conditions from the same ensemble of global climate model integrations for present (–) and Cited by: improving the representation of hydrologic processes in land models. In section 3, we contrast the current representation of hydrologic processes in modern land models (Table 1) with the modeling approaches used in the hydrologic sciences.

Our goal for this (rather focused) review is to identify key opportunities toCited by: CMIP (Climate Model Intercomparison Project) Overview The CMIP is a standard experimental framework for studying the output of coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models.

This facilitates assessment of the strengthsand weaknesses of climate models which can enhance and focus the development of future models. range of climate sensitivities found in model intercomparisons. The Stable Water-isotope Intercomparison Group (SWING) brings together modeling groups with GCMs capable of simulation the isotopic composition of water to deduce differences in the atmospheric hydrology and exchange processes in climate models though isotope simulations.

Introduction. General circulation models (GCMs) are useful tools to explore plausible future climate changes. The ability of these models to provide reliable simulations of climate at a global scale is continuously increasing as the models become more sophisticated and their projections of future climate conditions are becoming more by: The objective of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP) is to better understand past, present and future climate changes arising from natural, unforced variability or in response to changes in radiative forcing in a multi-model context.

This understanding includes assessments of model performance during the historical period and. Cross‐scale intercomparison of climate change impacts simulated by regional and global hydrological models in eleven large river basins.

Climatic Change (3): DOI: /sCited by: In this study, climate change impacts from extreme meteorological events over the period – are predicted and analyzed. Four coupled model intercomparison project phase 5 (CMIP5) global climate models (GCMs) under respectively concentration pathways (RCP and RCP) emission scenarios were used for climate change predictions.

classification and availability of such models, but of greater interest here are the series of projects aimed at comparing the performance of the models. The first of these intercomparison projects was undertaken between and and was devoted to rainfall-runoff models.

Ten models from seven countries were tested on six data sets. hydrologic community in areas covering surface water models, groundwater models, hydrologic impacts of climate change, non-stationarity in hydrologic processes and uncertainty quantification.

Large river basins such as the Ganga, Brahmaputra, Mahanadi and Krishna basins have been studied, among others. The following sections provide an overview File Size: KB. climate projections that are appropriately scaled for use in a hydrologic model.

They involve further post-processing of gridded climate projections to individual station locations, which is similar to weather forecasting applications, wherein model Linking Global Climate Models Journal of Contemporary Water researCh & eduCation UCOWR Intercomparison of the cloud water phase among global climate models Muge Komurcu1, Trude Storelvmo1, Ivy Tan1, Ulrike Lohmann2, Yuxing Yun3,4, Joyce E.

Penner3, Yong Wang5,6, Xiaohong Liu5,6, and Toshihiko Takemura7 1Department of Geology and Geophysics, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, USA, 2Institute of Atmospheric and Climate Science. Climate Change and Hydrologic Models: A Review of Existing Gaps and Recent Research Developments of hydrological processes in GCMs.

resolution, regional geography, and hydrology of global climate models. The choice of a model for a particular case study depends on many factors (Gleick, ), while the study purpose, model and data.